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3 Big Reasons I Pay My Kids to do Jobs (not chores) Around the House

3 Big Reasons I Pay My Kids to do Jobs (not chores) Around the House

Pin image for 3 Big Reasons I Pay My Kids to do Jobs (not chores) Around the HouseAre you currently paying your kids to take care of certain jobs around the house? Or do you give your children a weekly allowance without requiring them to do anything to earn that money?

A while back I had an idea. I was always buying things for my kids and I thought, why don’t I take that money I was going to spend on them anyway and actually teach them some money lessons instead. Why don’t I pay my kids to do jobs! I love a good teachable moment! 

Of course, my kids have chores that need to be done regularly around the house. Think: making their beds and doing their laundry. I’m not talking about those things. I’m talking about the things that go above and beyond the normal daily household routine, like things that could be taken off my plate. For example: vacuuming the stairs, cleaning the microwave, or dusting the baseboards and shutters. Now, I pay my kids for doing those things.

If you’re wondering why, here are the 3 main reasons I pay my kids for doing these jobs around our house: 

I want to teach them the basics of money management. 

These are things like saving, spending, and giving. These are basic money lessons they are going to need to learn eventually. Why not start earlier on?

So, I’ll ask them what it is that they want to buy and they can slowly work up to saving for that thing. I have them divide the money into those 3 categories. How much do they want to put toward their goal, how much do they want to have available to spend on a treat, and how much do they want to put towards charity or gifts for others. 

Now, this concept of teaching them to save what they’ve earned is really helpful in letting them in on how to budget their pay in the future. It starts them out on those habits but on a smaller scale. It will lead to a healthy relationship with money once they start earning their own income.

What I’ve noticed is that when they are using their own money, they are a bit more conservative with their spending. This tells me that what I’m teaching is really sinking in!

I want them to learn to have a solid work ethic. 

They know this is a job and they know they have to do it well. Just like when they get out into the real world, they need to do their job properly in order to get paid. If they rush through it or don’t do a good job, I have them do it over before paying them. This teaches them the kind of work ethic I want them to have. Life isn’t just about having fun, you need to work hard, too. I always tell my kids: work hard, play harder. 

In our house, the kids do their jobs on Saturday. They have to get their jobs done before they even think about opening their iPad or turning the TV on. 

It’s all about responsibility. 

My kids are each assigned different jobs and they are each responsible for making sure their job gets done and that it gets done well. If they are assigned a job, they need to do it and take ownership of their responsibilities. 

Allowances vs. Jobs

If you are one who gives an allowance to your kids, I highly recommend you switch things up a bit. At the very least, in the verbiage. Think about what the word “allowance” says to your kids as compared to calling it a job and paying them for doing that job. When kids get an allowance, sometimes they feel entitled to the money instead of having to work for it. As adults, we know this isn’t how the real world works. We need to work in order to earn money, we aren’t just given money for existing. (though that would be nice, right?) It’s a tiny shift in language that could make a huge shift in your kids mindset and attitude. 

If you’d like to learn more about budgeting, I’ll be hosting a Happy Family Budgeting Workshop in just a few weeks. Head here for all of the details and to get signed up!

19 Ways to Prepare For The Dreaded Teen Years

19 Ways to Prepare For The Dreaded Teen Years

Picture this…your daughter has made it to her senior year in high school, she’s confident in herself, is a straight A student, top of her class, successfully juggles work, sports and school, everyone loves her, she has a good attitude, is ambitious, well rounded, and responsible.  It’s basically everything you could ever hope for your daughter to become.

So why do we cringe then when people ask us, “so are you ready for the teenage years?”  Why do most of us dread these years? Well we can’t help to feel that way when we hear stories like “my daughter committed suicide, my son is getting into fights at school, they are being bullied, my daughter is pregnant, my kids rebel at us every chance they get, getting into trouble with the law, and of course, my kids have major attitude.

BUT…..What if there was a magic pill that we could give to our kids that will guarantee they turn out like the perfect angel we envision them to grow up to be?  Hah! Fat chance right?

The truth is that we can’t guarantee our kid’s teen years will be smooth sailing. Obviously we all know that much.  As parents, we have the best of intentions for our kids. So if there is no magic pill, what would be the next best thing? A friend recommended, “Taking off to Hawaii for a few years to meditate and find enlightenment while the husband stays back and holds up the fort”.  Sigh…if only that was reality.

In all seriousness, I do believe we as parents, can make or break these teenage years.

As a parent who has yet to go through this phase myself, there is tremendous value in learning from parents who have survived the much dreaded teenage years.

So I hope to share some advice that I have collected and some “things I would have done differently” from other parents that you and I may be able glean from to help us to best prepare ourselves and our kids through their adolescent life as best as possible.  The more we know, the better we can prepare.

  1. Always listen listen listen.  Have a lot of discussions and talk with them about everything.  Praise them when they share with you “So glad you were able to tell me that” So the communication ways stay open.  You want them to come to you when they face a tough choice. Also have many talks about sex. Made huge difference in late teen sand early 20’s.
  2. Set clear expectations and boundaries so that you can give them their independence and room to make mistakes and learn and grow from it
  3. Teach money and responsibilities at an earlier age
  4. Be more open minded
  5. Encourage them to make their own decisions so they would become independent & self determined individuals
  6. Don’t lecture, preach, or nag, but rather listen and guide them.  Respect their thoughts
  7. Earning money to get what they wanted.  Saving more for it makes the appreciate and value life more.  Teach then they can do and become who or whatever they dream, when they get out in the world, but for now do what I say when you’re under my roof
  8. So I can pass on my bullet proof vest, cape, safety goggles and box of tissues and tell all of you to hold on, be consistent, set boundaries, learn to deflect the eye roll, monitor social media and communicate with your child as their parent
  9. Too many outlets these days ie via social media so it allows them to avoid the issue instead of facing it.  Social media makes heightens peer pressure, low self image and self esteem because it’s so easy to see your friends and compare yourself, even though it is all a facade.
  10. Don’t fight with them to get your way.  Work on compromise and problem solving with them.  Let them take the lead on coming up with a game plan because that’s the only one that will work
  11. Don’t give them everything they want, make them earn it themselves
  12. Let them fall down a few more times in life.  I look back and think I didn’t prepare them well enough for disappointment in the real world.
  13. Set expectations but let them create their path (earn money, behavior, respect, set goals etc)
  14. Provide structure and keep them busy in their younger years with activities so they have less opportunity to get themselves into trouble or associate with the wrong friends
  15. Be 100% open and honest
  16. Instruct them that they always have choices, but consider the consequence of each decision
  17. would be more hands on with their goings and not so much freedom.  Talk more
  18. Never be so busy that you don’t have the time
  19. Teach them to be a leader and not a follower.

All of these pointers are so important!  Boy do we have a lot of work to do ahead of us to prepare.  The one thing I have been hearing being repeated multiple times is to do whatever you can to make sure the line of communication is open.  The last thing we want is for our kids to shut down and feel like they can’t come to us to discuss their problems.

If you have read this far, you’re probably thinking, “sure…easier said than done!”  No doubt about it. All we can do is our best and hope for the best. What I do know for sure is that the earlier we can incorporate some of these skills and values into our kids, the easier it will be when our kids become teenagers themselves.

Among all the dreaded stories are the ones that give us new parents the hope that our kids will turn out ok.  That we can trust them to make good and safe choices. Stories that inspires us to strive to experience the same kind of relationships with our kids and stories that we can look forward to for ourselves as well.  So there is light at the end of the tunnel when you hear comments like these:

“I have 3 teenage girls 14, 16, 18 and 22 year old son.  I am loving this stage of life more than any other stages so far”

“I’m loving the teen years so far!!!…I have 2 teenage boys, they’re like little men, with their own opinions and jokes!  Fun time for sports”

“It has its definite stresses but I love it!  The conversations are awesome”

“It is so fun to watch them grow into the adults they will be, and the conversations we have now I wouldn’t trade for anything”

So let’s get out there and raise our kids to grow up into strong, independent, and successful men and women of the future. Let’s not dread the teen years but instead, look forward to them and make them be the best years we possibly can.

graduation

Image by greymatters via Pixabay

Stay Prepared for Life’s Accidents

Bumps, bruises and owies – oh my! Parenthood is never boring. Be prepared with a first aid kit designed exclusively with you and your kids in mind.  Check out PreparaKit.com for kits and tools created for busy parents who want to be ready for the unexpected.